An Introduction to Cloud Computing

Whether you work in an IT-intensive industry or simply take a personal interest in the world of computer technology, you’ve probably heard the term “cloud computing”. However, you may not be sure what this really means. Simply put, cloud computing allows you to store your data on online servers that are independent of the hardware you keep at home or at work. It also allows you to access software through the Internet without installing it on your own computers. But is cloud computing right for you?

One of the key benefits of cloud computing is that it ensures your data remains intact, even if your computer breaks. Here at PC Callout, we pride ourselves on our computer repairs: we can fix almost any desktop or laptop computer. However, it’s not always possible to recover all the data on a computer after it experiences a fault. It may also not be possible to recover every piece of software from a damaged computer hard disk drive. Cloud computing ensures that you can always access your data and use important pieces of software, regardless of what happens to your hardware.

However, cloud computing does have two major drawbacks. Firstly, because data that is stored online can be accessed remotely, it’s far easier to hack into than data stored offline. If you have sensitive data, it’s not always advisable to store it in the cloud unless you can encrypted it first. Secondly, you will almost certainly have to pay a cloud computing provider a fee to use their servers. The cost of cloud computing can, therefore, be somewhat prohibitive to home computer users.

As you can see, it’s important to take a number of factors into consideration when deciding if you want to use cloud computing. Firstly, you should consider how important it is to preserve your data and how much you need to access certain pieces of software. Secondly, you should think about how important the security of your data is (and weigh this against the need to preserve that data). Finally, you should decide if the benefits of cloud computing justify the financial cost.

You may choose to take advantage of cloud computing for some of your data but not all of it, and to access some programs but not others. Alternatively, you may choose to back up all your data using cloud computing, or decide that it doesn’t fit your business or home computing needs at all. Whatever you choose to do, we hope our short introduction has helped you come to the right decision!